Jodaeiye Nader az Simin, 2011.

(via salamcinema)

Source: apollodoesnotexist

Originally from ночной осенний ветер продует нас н


The Ah Fei movies of the 1950s featured characters sporting James Dean hairstyles and mannerisms, but not all of them were meant to be heroes. The term “Ah Fei” denotes a young hoodlum, a delinquent or scapegrace in Cantonese. “Fei” literally means “fly, ” a metaphor for youth old enough to sprout wings and fly away from controlling parents, and once flown, usually degenerates into socially unacceptable modes of behaviour. The term is time-specific, being generally in use in the 1950s and 60s.
Days of Being Wild rather self-consciously alludes to the Ah Fei genre: first, in its Cantonese title A Fei Zhengzhuan (The Story of an Ah Fei), which was incidentally the Chinese title for Rebel Without a Cause when it was released in Hong Kong. Second, Yuddy alludes to Ah Fei metaphorically in a monologue early in the film: “I heard tell that in this world, there’s a bird without legs. It can only fly and fly. When it’s tired it sleeps in the wind. It lands on earth only once in its life. That is when it dies.” The bird and flight metaphor is already implicit in the Ah Fei label, which Yuddy obviously wears with some pride, and The Story of an Ah Fei is his story. 
- Stephen Teo

The Ah Fei movies of the 1950s featured characters sporting James Dean hairstyles and mannerisms, but not all of them were meant to be heroes. The term “Ah Fei” denotes a young hoodlum, a delinquent or scapegrace in Cantonese. “Fei” literally means “fly, ” a metaphor for youth old enough to sprout wings and fly away from controlling parents, and once flown, usually degenerates into socially unacceptable modes of behaviour. The term is time-specific, being generally in use in the 1950s and 60s.

Days of Being Wild rather self-consciously alludes to the Ah Fei genre: first, in its Cantonese title A Fei Zhengzhuan (The Story of an Ah Fei), which was incidentally the Chinese title for Rebel Without a Cause when it was released in Hong Kong. Second, Yuddy alludes to Ah Fei metaphorically in a monologue early in the film: “I heard tell that in this world, there’s a bird without legs. It can only fly and fly. When it’s tired it sleeps in the wind. It lands on earth only once in its life. That is when it dies.” The bird and flight metaphor is already implicit in the Ah Fei label, which Yuddy obviously wears with some pride, and The Story of an Ah Fei is his story. 

- Stephen Teo

(via whywildwild)

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Source: salamcinema

Originally from Cinema with Feeeeelings

xarelicious asked

wow great blog, very interesting!

thank you! glad you like it :)

"In order to start over, we left Hong Kong. We hit the road and ended up in Argentina."

Happy Together (1997), Wong Kar-Wai

(via whywildwild)

Source: salamcinema

Originally from Cinema with Feeeeelings

jennyukari:

Il Mare (2000)

We’re tormented because love goes on… not because it goes away.

Originally from tuesday in silhouette.

If my memory of her has an expiration date, let it be 10,000 years…

(via whywildwild)

Source: zombiejig

Originally from I WANNA GO TO DISNEY WORLD

"Dear Watanabe Hiroko
I’m too embarrassed to mail this letter to you.” 

Love Letter (1995), Iwai Shunji

(via unlighted)

Source: theoangelo

Originally from Cinema with Feeeeelings

Happy Together (春光乍泄) dir. by Wong Kar-Wai

(via thedancingtoast)

Source: badboyjules

Originally from ang munting prinsipe

A Muse

A Muse

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Originally from Fuck Yeah Asian Movie

zombie-sodashop:

Three Times - directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien

zombie-sodashop:

Three Times - directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien

Originally from Bad Wolf Bay

stillsgallery:

Chungking Express (1994)

Wong Kar Wai

Originally from stills stills stills gallery gallery gallery

Do you regret being with me?

Happy Together (1997, Hong Kong) Directed by: Wong Kar-wai

Originally from gilbogarbage

sosreelthoughts:

Eros: The Hand 

(2004, Wong Kar-wai)

Originally from So's Reel Thoughts

atinycorner:

Chang Chen in Wong Kar-wai’s Eros, Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Three Times and Kim Ki-duk’s Breath

Originally from Mostly cats and fangirl rants.

atinycorner:

Three Times (2005) dir. Hou Hsiao-hsien

atinycorner:

Three Times (2005) dir. Hou Hsiao-hsien

Originally from Mostly cats and fangirl rants.